#Inspiration #3.2.1 Me Challenge

Sue Vincent of The Daily Echo kindly nominated me for the 3.2.1 Me Challenge, giving me the word “Inspiration” for my topic. Thank you, Sue. Do check out her response to the challenge, “Time.”

 

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The seemingly inert forms of rocks inspire me, even those found in New England. In this photo, taken at Acadia National Park in Maine, I can see dozens of faces, each with a different story to tell.

 

Did you know “inspiration” not only means “that which spurs creativity and action,” but also the “intake of breath?”  I rather like the link between these two definitions. What inspires you to breathe life in? Fully and completely, capturing its essence as you do so? Connecting your life to its life…Your form to another’s…

I think, perhaps, the key is a connection. Finding that which sparks the synapses to fire across the bridge of singularity. That moment when we inspire the breath and say to ourselves, “ah ha, there is a certain something here I need to explore,” and in that exploration don’t we inevitably discover something about ourselves? A deep-seated longing, perhaps, that we now cannot ignore?

While looking up quotes on inspiration, I came across these words attributed to Bob Dylan,”Inspiration is hard to come by. You have to take it where you find it.” I find this rather sad and tend to disagree with it. Are we really that disconnected from life, and, one could extrapolate, the source of the air we breathe?

Mr. Dylan seems to be implying that inspiration is an elusive object, which is hard to obtain. I tend to think of it as just the opposite. Inspiration, I find, is everywhere, waiting for us to take notice. To take in the deep inhale of its life into our cells and allow them to spark fresh awareness. It’s a sad thought to think most of us spend our time breathing stale, shallow breaths without any sense of wonderment, but maybe Bob is onto something here…

While searching for actual quotes on inspiration (rather than “inspiration quotes,” which seem to occur in abundance), I came across this an interview with Ray Bradbury that appeared on Fresh Air, where he stated, “It’s lack that gives us inspiration,” he said. “It’s not fullness. Not ever having driven, I can write better about automobiles than the people who drive them. I have a distance here. … Space travel is another good example. I’m never going to go to Mars but I’ve helped inspire, thank goodness, the people who built the rockets and sent our photographic equipment off to Mars. So it’s always a lack that causes you to write that type of story.”

Again, I find myself in partial agreement. Lack of oxygen quite literally causes us to inspire, adding more air to our lungs. Bradbury, though, seems to be talking about what spurs creative inspiration. The lack of knowledge, causing us to seek. I suppose if we were full of all life, of all the answers to each and every question out there, there may, in fact, be nothing to inspire us. Why draw the breath in if the lungs are already full?

A full brain has nothing else to learn, but really, is that ever really possible? I may think I know the mechanics of driving, having driven for nearly 3 decades, multiple vehicles, with automatic and standard transmissions, yet I was still inspired to drive recently in England and found there was much to be discovered in this adventure of driving on the wrong left side of unfamiliar roads.

The ordinary became extraordinary, as I pushed past fears to find wonderment. Yet one need not, I believe, try driving on the opposite side of the road in a foreign land to find inspiration, one need only look with a little more depth at familiar surroundings, or breath in a little more air.

I often say I travel to England to find magic. In this ancient landscape, there is much that inspires me. It’s virtually effortless to find inspiration there, for me. Yet, here in New England, I find it is easy to fall victim to the mundane, or the Bob Dylan syndrome if you will. Yet, I realize, that is my fault, and not that of the landscape. There is magic in each blade of grass if you are willing to look at it more closely and marvel at the intricacy of its creation. Even the rocks here have much to offer, even those not aligned to the stars.

The key lies in the word itself. Allowing myself to inspire life, and breath deep its essence, even if that life is seemingly inert, there is always something new to take in and discover. Endless layers…endless molecules of air. The lungs always seeking more breath after exhaling that which has not been absorbed by the body.

While writing this post, a male cardinal appeared outside in my Rose of Sharon bush. It created quite a scene, as it flew in and out of the blooms and around the nearby foliage, as though it was trying to get my attention. Later, I thought about the cardinal feather I found years ago and had studied closely in a meditative state as part of a lesson with the Silent Eye School, discovering the feather was not merely red-orange, but filled with all the colors of the rainbow. “Now that’s something to write about,” Sue replied to my discovery.

One might say it was a joy to discover the rainbow in the red feather, and so I’ll leave the post with this word, “joy,” as the next challenge for three nominated bloggers if they choose to accept: Andrea Stephenson of Harvesting Hecate Julianne Victoria of Through the Peacock’s Eyes, and Colleen Briggs of Fragments of Light. Please write a post about “Joy,” including two quotes on the subject and nominate three other bloggers to blog about a word of your choosing.

Thank you again, Sue, for the “inspiration!”

 

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About Alethea Kehas

I am an author and owner of Inner Truth Healing & Yoga.
This entry was posted in Reflections and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to #Inspiration #3.2.1 Me Challenge

  1. Thank you Alethea! My little “joy” keeps me busy, but I will write up a post soon! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Sue Vincent says:

    A lovely response, Alethea. I remember that feather… what a long time ago that seems now, and such a journey in between 🙂 x

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Suzanne says:

    I really like your thoughts on inspiration. I find it elusive sometimes when life gets too mundane and familiar. I agree with you when you say doing something different can be very inspirational. There’s a lot to think about in your essay – it’s a bit like that cardinal feather. At first it seems to be just one colour but there are shades and variations within that. You have inspired me to think more about inspiration and where it comes from.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I agree that inspiration is everywhere – interesting that you mention Ray Bradbury as his book Zen and the art of writing is the most inspiring writing book I’ve ever read! Now I’ll ponder on joy 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Pingback: #Inspiration #3.2.1 Me Challenge ~ Althea Kehas | Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

  6. Wonderful post Alethea and I think inspiration changes with age, as you describe your automatic responses to driving on one side of the road compared with the new experience of driving on the other. I think it is up to us to not become complacent and stay within our comfort zones and reach out to learn more, read more, see more and meet more people to keep finding inspiration throughout our lives. Those of us in our 60s and 70s are the first of the older generation to have such amazing access to the outside world and a much wider circle of connections that any other generation before us.. it is incredible. Sally

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Pingback: Smorgasbord Blogger Daily – Thursday 30th August 2018 – Norah Colvin, Janice Spina and Alethea Kehas #EarlyReading and #Inspiration | Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life

  8. Pingback: Joy | Through the Peacock's Eyes

  9. Norah says:

    I enjoyed reading your thoughts about inspiration, Alethea, and am more inclined to agree with you than Bob Dylan! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Pingback: A joyful interlude | Harvesting Hecate

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